Posts Tagged 'Letter-writing advice'

What Not To Write – Dear Emily…

The toughest letter: the day after dropoff or visiting day

For many northern camps, today is the Monday morning after visiting day or the day after second/third session drop-off. Since this Monday can be a challenging one for many parent letter-writers, we’re taking a break from the usual suggestions on what TO write to your camper. Instead, take a look at the following letter to  see a few obvious pitfalls to avoid (at least we hope they’re obvious!). See the bottom of the post for more on what TO write. 

Continue reading ‘What Not To Write – Dear Emily…’

Advertisements

What Not to Pack

Sometimes too much is, well, too much

Let’s face it, some things are better left at home.  Same goes for letters to camp.  A few years ago, I wrote the  “Letters to Camp Packing List” post. Now here are a few things NOT to pack in your first (or any) letter:

Continue reading ‘What Not to Pack’

Welcome Back!

Can you believe that it’s time for camp?  We’re about to open up Letters to Camp for the season, filled with great tips for parents who want to write better letters to their sleep-away campers!  Can’t wait to share the latest but I do hope you’ll check out the great posts that are already on the site – covering everything from joke and bible sites to sample letters, fill-in-the-blank letters, and even CampLibs (just like Mad Libs but to your camper).  It’s going to be another great season – can’t wait for you to join us!

Check out the tags for links to more great posts!

7 Point Font & Other Acts of Desperation

Shrtr ltrs 2 cmp

By now, you’re a seasoned letter-writer.  Your letters to camp are masterful.  Funny.  No, hysterical.  Engaging.  Illuminating.  Pieces of fine art.  World-class prose.  On par with those of John and Abigail Adams.  But if your letters are too long, how can you shorten them?

Continue reading ‘7 Point Font & Other Acts of Desperation’

More Jokes

Yesterday I listed kid-safe joke sites.  Following is a list of general sites that have a mix of kid-friendly and not so kid-friendly jokes.  But most of these sites have a great selection of appropriate jokes so you’ll want to check them out. The best sites are at the top of the list.

General Jokes Sites

Broad selection of general jokes without sections dedicated to kids.

 

  • Comedy Zone. Huge selection of jokes, many of which are clean.  Easily browse-able with titles for each joke. Check out the extensive collection of funny pictures.  Looks like this site hails from the United Kingdom.
  • Joke-Best. Reader-rated jokes.  More clean jokes than many other sites.  Browse-able.  Easy to navigate.
  • Funny and Jokes. Good selection.Click on a category to see a selection of jokes on one page.  Click to see more.  Browse-able.  Decent number of categories.
  • The Joke Yard. Moderate selection of jokes with many categories.  Browse-able to short list of jokes in a given category. Check out clean one liners.  Click more categories to see a huge list of categories.  Great feature: shows if joke is clean, rude etc.  Beware: many rude jokes.  It’s also ad-supported so you never know what’s going to show up.
  • Funnyjokes.org. Click on categories to read random jokes, one at a time.  A bit tedious since you can’t browse for specific jokes.
  • Cool funny jokes.  Very easy to find new jokes from the home page.  You’ll have to look for the funny jokes.  Note that some people will find selected links and  jokes offensive.  Fully browse-able.  Beware: sometimes displays racy ads.
  • Joke-Of-The-Day.  Very easy to browse with descriptions.  Lots of clean jokes although much of the humor may be beyond the reach or interest of children.  Don’t go here looking for “the joke of the day” though.
  • Lots of Jokes.  Moderate selection of funny kids jokes but not easy to browse.  The main site contains many jokes, many of which are not appropriate for children.  Site has a lot of advertising.

Resources:

More funny stuff from the Letters To Camp Blog.
A Letter A Day Makes A Happy Camper

Advice: Letters FROM Camp

I started this blog because it’s so hard to find ideas about writing letters TO camp.  But there’s no shortage of parental advice and concern about letters FROM camp.  Check these out:

  • Decoding letters from camp. A recent New York Times post, “Letters from Sleep-away Camp,” included Randy Wedin’s decoding of his kids’ letters and their evolving sentiments.
  • No news… The Summer Camp Handbook advises that “No news is good news when it comes to kids at camp.  If you don’t receive any letters from your child while she’s at camp, you’re not alone.”
  • Downs and Ups. In the blog, Life the C Train, Clare’s “Letters from Camp” chronology perfectly summarizes the parent/child letter-writing experience.  If your child has never been to camp before, this is a must-read.
  • Letters = Love. Amy Howorth guest-wrote for Parent Talk Today.  She told how she dutifully to her kids at camp, which her kids did not of course reciprocate.  But all was forgotten when her son wrote, “Thanks for sending me the letters mom. It made me feel loved.”
  • Letter from a shopaholic. If you’re a shopaholic, it’s probably a safe bet that your kid is one too, even at camp.  Check out Camp Letters – An SOS Letter from Summer Camp.
  • Visiting Day. A touching story from several years ago.  Every parent will relate to this story of letters and visitng day.
  • Funny letters back and forth. Mike Sacks’ funny — and very sarcastic — letters to and from camp – I recently linked to this funny post too.

Great Letter-Writing Advice from Camp Greystone

What do letters to camp have to do with camp atmosphere?
As it turns out, plenty!

A great summer camp will work to create a specific type of atmosphere in camp.  Many camps believe that summer is a time to disconnect from email, cell phones, etc.  When sending letters, emails or faxes, remember that camps set their policies to reflect the atmosphere and values of the camp.  In other words, expect that policies will vary widely from camp to camp.

I come across many camp websites that offer thoughtful suggestions and guidelines for letter-writing.  For example, check out Camp Greystone in North Carolina.  They also had great advice about birthdays too – see the last blog post.

Among other things, Camp Greystone advises parents to:

  • Write letters by hand
  • Be creative
  • Take time to do a good job
  • Write often
  • Allow plenty of time for “snail mail” to work

You can read more on their site.  As you can tell from their tips, kids enjoy letters and letter-writing is an art that requires time and even planning.  Of course, that’s why I started this blog – to help parents write great letters to their campers.

A final note on logistics. As I mentioned earlier, while most camps allow and encourage hand-written USPS mail (aka “snail mail”), email and fax policies vary widely between camps.  Unlike Camp Greystone, most camps seems to allow email although many will charge extra for it.  Make sure to check with your camp to ensure that you fully understand their policies.

For more tips, see last summer’s post on letter-writing advice .


Follow us on Twitter!

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 542 other followers

Finally – Help for Parent Letter-Writers

Challenged to write great letters to your camper(s)? Help is here! The Letters to Camp Blog will help you to write better letters. More

Letters to Camp is on YouTube!

Check this out.

Check out the Solution Marketing Blog. If you're in software marketing, the Solution Marketing Blog is a great resource.

Blog Stats

  • 1,162,824 hits

Follow us on Twitter!

Advertisements